physical therapy

Telehealth

Telehealth services is one method that physical therapist can use to see their patients while maintaining patient and provider safety. As you know the Covid-19 pandemic caused providers to look outside the box of traditional healthcare and into new creative care using  telehealth to avoid spreading infection. Telehealth promotes social distancing between patient and provider using a computer and soft wear to connect therapist and patient. Telehealth is being used across the US successfully for most patients. However, this practice is not for every patient. Patients that require hands on care will need face to face visits.

Benefits of telehealth:

  • Quality care without leaving your house
  • Specialist care in Oklahoma State
  • Save money on traveling
  • Older or disabled patients who have difficulty getting out for
  • Routine monitoring of condition
  • Reduce hospital care

Yukon Wound Care & Rehabilitation is practicing telehealth to keep our patients and staff safe. If you think you or a loved one could benefit from telehealth services please call 405-265-2255 of have your physician fax orders to 405-265-2215

Telehealth2020-03-31T16:00:52+00:00

TMJ – Temporomandibular Joint

Temporomandibular Joint

Temporomandibular joint aka TMJ is pain in and around the ear where the mandible attaches to the skull. The temporomandibular (TMJ) joint allows you to open and close your mouth for chewing, talking and yawning. Dysfunction of this joint causes jaw pain, headaches, swelling, numbness, radiating pain, stiffness, jaw locking, clicking and popping.

Occasionally acute TMJ pain will improve without treatment using home remedies such as soft food, heat, ice and NSAID’s. However, TMJ can develop into chronic pain and need physical therapy help to resolve pain and restore joint function. Our out-patient clinic uses manual techniques to relax the surrounding joint muscles, integrative dry needling, ultrasound, joint tapping, electrical stimulation, heat and ice to resolve pain and restore function.References

Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction. (2017, January 2).

Retrieved from https://www.nidcr.nih.gov/sites/default/files/2017-09/less-is-best-tmj.pdf

TMJ – Temporomandibular Joint2019-07-15T14:48:58+00:00

Breathe Easy

Chest Physical Therapy

Chest physical therapy (Chest PT) is a manual physical therapy technique used for airway passage clearance. It consist of percussion, vibration, deep breathing and coughing. The technique is used to create a productive cough to clear mucus and fluid from the five lobes of the lungs. Chest PT can be used for various diagnosis such as flu, cold, asthma, pneumonia, bronchitis, chronic obstruction pulmonary disease (COPD), neurological disorders, or bed bound persons.

The two main techniques are percussion and vibration. Percussion is done by slightly cupping the hand and clapping against the chest wall. Having the hand cupped provides comfort and less of a slapping sensation. Vibration is performed by gently shaking the chest wall with a flattened hand to loosen the mucus from the lungs. Person is placed in various positions to allow postural drainage to assist with the production of mucus. Each technique is then followed by attempting a productive cough to expel the mucus.

Our clinic provides manual chest therapy for all ages and we highly recommend this treatment for cold and flu season to prevent pneumonia and other complications from congestion.

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Chest Physical Therapy. Retrieved from https://www.cff.org/Life-With-CF/Treatments-and-Therapies/Airway-Clearance/Chest-Physical-Therapy/

Breathe Easy2019-08-27T15:26:29+00:00

Soft Tissue Injuries

physical therapist yukonFalls, trauma and sport related injuries cause problems to bones and soft tissue structures. Because soft tissue structures can be strained or even ruptured a grading scale is used to determine damage and proper treatment (Boissonnault, 2011). Grade I soft tissue strain is an over stretch of tissue without rupture. Grade II soft tissue strain is a partial tear in the tissue without disruption to the fascia. Grade I and II injuries cause local tenderness, edema, muscle spasm, bruising and pain with movement (Boissonnault, 2011).

Early treatment for grades I and II consist of rest, ice, compression and elevation. Once the acute swelling and pain subsides approximately 7 to 10 days a referral to physical therapy to restore motion, weight bearing, reduce swelling and pain and restore soft tissue function is necessary.

However, grade III soft tissue injury is more involved resulting in compete tear of soft tissue (muscle) and fasciaresulting in total loss of movement and possible surgical repair. Grade III injuries cause edema, blisters, pain, superficial and deep bruising, and palpable soft tissue defect. Referral to a wound care specialist for debridement and wound healing may be required along with a referral to orthopedic specialist for joint repair. Once the grade III injury is repaired and healing has occurred a referral to physical therapy is protocol to restore motion, reduce swelling and pain, regain weight bearing and normal function.

References

Boissonnault, W. G. (2011). Primary care for the physical therapist (2nd ed.). St, Louis, Missouri: Saunders.

Soft Tissue Injuries2019-01-22T19:42:34+00:00